Rosemark Neo & Wide Top putter grip review

I realize most people don’t get excited about putter grips.

But, I think they should, if they want to make a more consistent stroke while applying less grip pressure. Grips are the only point of contact a player has with the club and you need the very best connection with your putter, the ultimate scoring (or non-scoring) club.

The first time I tried a Rosemark grip four years ago I was hooked.

There was no adjustment period, nothing to get used to, the grip just felt better from the first moment I used it. My assumption was that I liked the material, especially the microfiber underlayment and the polymer nubs.

There are at least two secrets to Rosemark grips.

The first is shape. Mark Cokewell head honcho at Rosemark told me the cross-sectional shape of the grip is the result of mapping the hand’s points of contact with the grip. The other secret, especially on the older versions I have used for the last few years, is the combination of the microfiber foundation and the polymer nubs I mention above.

Rosemark

Mark Cokewell had this to say about his latest models.

“The Wide Top is a non taper non pistol hexagon grip that was designed around the contact points of the hands. It has a wider face thus the name Wide Top. We came out with the Wide Top early 2018 and it has won three times on the LPGA so far. Jasmine Sawannapura (Marathon Classic) and Brooke Henderson (Lotte in Hawaii and Meijer in Grand Rapids). All of our grips except the 7Teen are available in both MFS (Microfiber Silicon) with the beads AND Neo (Neoprene) smooth. The Neo grip material is super high tech and stays tacky when cold/wet or with sweaty hands. It won’t get slippery when dirty and it’s washable although it rarely needs to be cleaned. It will last at least twice as long as a PU material grip (SuperStroke). The MFS grip has a Microfiber base with silicon beads added to enhance feel and tackiness. The Microfiber wicks away moisture while the beads provide the tack. A synthetic breathable coating is applied last to enhance tackiness where the beads are sans. The areas of the grip void of beads are super receptor areas where the finger tips and thumbs make contact with the grip. This feature provides better tactile feedback of the ball coming off the face of the putter and aides the golfer to develop a better sense of pace on putts and also feel when putts are hit off center.”

Grips installed

Here are the original Rosemark designs on my gamers and two of their new designs.

The Neo is second from right and the MFS Wide Top is second from left. Me? I could make putts with any of them but I must say that the Neo is really growing on me. I thought I would miss the nubs (Mark Cokewell calls ’em beads, by the way) but I didn’t.

In the end, it may be that the overriding benefit of using Rosemark grips is the cross- sectional geometry that, for me, makes it not only easier to set my grip pressure and forget it but also to enjoy superior feel in all weather.

Still, I love the texture of all of the Rosemark grips, so I think that’s  huge issue, too. A grip that feels better will perform better in the same way that a club that looks better behind the ball is likely to result in better ball striking. The materials and designs employed by Rosemark allow their grips to convey a lot about the quality of the strike. And, the better the strike the more likely your putt is to stay on its line and roll the distance you need. I have not used any other grip that gives me the feel of a putt, whether long or short, anywhere near as well.

Why be uncomfortable when you can be so, so comfortable?

Go out there and make some putts!

https://www.rosemarkgrips.com

Rosemark Neo & Wide Top putter grip review

The Rosemarks are installed, so let’s talk about the thrilling topic of Grip Solvent!

Yes, they’re perfectly aligned.

Yes, they’re fully seated.

Yes, I am a little too precise with this regripping thing and I’m not sure why.

I’m not even going to burden you with a blow-by-blow account of my grip replacement protocol.

Instead, let’s talk about grip solvent. I know, that’s some nasty, boring stuff.

IMG_1622

For years, I’ve used the Clubmaker brand, though I always disliked the smell and its tendency to cling to my hands even after repeated washings. So, I decided to try Wedge Guys grip solvent. It was reputed to smell better or at least less bad.

It’s true. It doesn’t smell bad at all and the order doesn’t seem to linger in the air as long as Clubmaker.

But…

There’s a problem. It also isn’t quite as uniformly slick when you’re installing the grip, no matter how much is used. It’s like there are slick spots and sticky spots and this is no good especially when you’re installing expensive grips.

Also…

The stuff dries very slowly and, this is a weird one, stays a little slimy even after it’s been on a grip for weeks.

How do I know this?

I know because I removed a few grips weeks after I installed them and the grip caps were still slimy and almost damp. Remember, this is SoCal so it’s both hot and dry.

So, my experiment is over…I’m sticking with Clubmakers.

Sorry, Wedge Guys!

The Rosemarks are installed, so let’s talk about the thrilling topic of Grip Solvent!

The new Rosemark Grips have arrived!

Grips

Regular readers know I am a huge fan of Rosemark grips.

I have been a believer in Rosemark since 2016 and I use their grips in all my putters.

I am very excited to learn if these new grips can meet or possibly exceed the standard set by the original Rosemark designs that I’ve used with great success.

Only time will tell.

They new ones look great and I’ll be installing them pursuant to my usual obsessive-compulsive grip installation standards later this afternoon.

 

The new Rosemark Grips have arrived!

Best writing advice for a Monday: Be comfy when you write.

I read an article not long ago that showed photos of the writing desks of notable authors.

It was interesting, a little, in the way going to an open house can be. Every writer seeks a space of control and comfort. I’ve been at this a long time and while I’ve never gotten it completely right, I can work with what I’ve got.

Desk
Yeah, I drink a lot of beer, but not when I’m writing.

That’s an eight year old MacMini in front and an even older one on the left. Both work just fine, thanks. The star of the show is the old Samsung SyncMaster 2243 monitor that allows me to have two full pages on the screen at once.

Nirvana.

When I discuss comfy, I’m thinking of the kind of comfort that allows an aspiring violinist to practice for hours without causing a repetitive-stress injury. This is the kind of comfy that flows from technique and ergonomics.

Years ago, I was lucky enough to have an ergonomics expert show me how to sit in a chair while engaging my feet with the floor.

I practice it to this day.

Still, I am not good at sitting for long periods of time. When I manage to bang out a bunch of words in a day I spend a lot of time out of my writing chair. There’s nothing physically healthy about writing and I’m trying to minimize the injury.

So, no matter how plush or comfortable your writing desk is, please get off your ass often.

Your heart will thank you.

I have considered a standing desk, but I have a feeling it would simply create a physical shift in stress. My guess is from lower back to upper back.

Still, I may try it someday.

 

 

Best writing advice for a Monday: Be comfy when you write.

More good writing advice: Don’t talk your story away.

Don’t think it away, either.

I have to admit I got this one from an episode of The Waltons called The Literary Man from Season One.

A older writer named A.J. Covington passes through Walton’s Mountain and regales John-Boy with tales of his travels and the stories he planned to write. Late in the episode, the old writer confessed to John-Boy that he didn’t really write any more.

He had made the mistake of talking his stories away.

I never heard of that, but it made sense immediately.

There’s something about the rhythm and crackle of decent writing that needs to come to existence on the page, not the tongue.

Once we speak it, we might compromise it somehow.

I don’t tend to talk my work away but I do have a tendency to think about my ideas too much. I try to avoid that kind of thought, though I don’t always succeed.

Instead, once I get an idea about a direction to take or a scene to tackle I try to get right at it; words on paper as quickly as possible.

More good writing advice: Don’t talk your story away.

TRUE Linkswear Sensei: The Irreplaceable Golf Shoe

I have two pair of the the ugliest golf shoes ever made.

On the other hand, they’re also the best & most comfortable golf shoe ever made, at least for my feet.

It’s hard for me to imagine why TRUE Linkswear stopped making them, but they did.

So now what?

Well, anticipating the inevitable demise of my first pair I bought a second (used) pair on Ebay. Because the shoes have such low profile soles (perfect for SoCal golf and its typically dry conditions) they’re actually very durable. Heck, I drive to the course wearing them and keep them on right through dinner and the drive home. They take an occasional trip through the washer (medium water temp, air dry) and they seem to tolerate the procedure without injury.

Who cares how they look?

SnapseedCome on, they don’t look that bad!

I know. TRUE is still in the game but the Sensei are gone and I don’t know why.

I’m happy to try TRUE’s new offerings but I’ll be surprised if they measure up to these babies.

Sometimes progress isn’t progress.

Here’s hoping this time it is.

 

TRUE Linkswear Sensei: The Irreplaceable Golf Shoe

Is the Apple HomePod a genuine threat to high end audio?

Yes, it is.

No, it’s not a real high end product.

No, you won’t be replacing your real system, assuming you still have one, with a HomePod.

Yes, you will be impressed by how fundamentally musical it is.

HomePod

The Apple HomePod is the first mass-market product, designed by a company with real engineering wallop, that was actually designed by people who wanted it to sound good and that fact should put existential fear into every high end company that’s still on the right side of the grass.

Let’s talk about setup. It’s OK, but like all new Apple products it entails a few more steps than it should and Apple’s Home app is kludgy. Bummer, that, but once you’re done with it you’re done with it, or so it seems so far.

On the operational front I’ve observed that Pandora skips momentarily about every ten to fifteen minutes. The funny thing is that it never skips on my iPhone or when I’m using my Air Pods.

What the?

That problem gave me the chance to test Spotify.

Odd, no skipping whatsoever.

Who knows what’s up there but I’m willing to blame Pandora until and unless it starts to happen with other sources. Not surprisingly, playback from iTunes / Music is just dandy.

What the folks at Apple have done here is to swing a big, heavy hammer at what should be an easy target, and for them it was. The HomePod is a technically and acoustically complex product. They’ve crammed a bunch of drivers into that little pod. If a high end company, or a lesser tech company, tried to do what Apple has done the result would have been a sonic or functional mess and probably both.

The HomePod sounds remarkable coherent from top to bottom. Even though I’m using it as what would be regarded as a monophonic speaker the result is quite natural from a spatial perspective. Remember, stereo is a trick. This kind of mono is simply another kind of trick, and it works because Apple figured out how to make it work.

But wait, let me talk about why I felt I needed a better speaker in my office than my beloved Soundfreaq Sound Spot Wood + White. There are two reasons, really. The first is that I need a speaker in my bedroom, and the Sound Spot is perfect for that. The second and more important reason flows from the damn book I’m writing. This whole book-writing thing entails seemingly endless hours of ass sitting, which I already hate. I’m actually thinking of hiring a personal trainer so that all this extra time sitting doesn’t knock too much time off my life expectancy.

The HomePod’s fundamental listenability and (comparatively) full range presentation brings just enough music into my office that I’m not constantly driven to get up and change the record or put in another CD or whatever. I can turn it up to annoyingly high levels when the music or mood calls for it or turn it down to the edge of silence when I’m trying desperately to think and it stays musically convincing.

The Pod simply sounds good. Yes, it takes some liberties and creates a sould-warming upper-bass hump so you won’t notice the lack of mid and lower bass. And, yes, all those drivers lead to an occasional if surprisingly minor megaphone effect that’s especially noticeable on female vocals.

But then, something will come on that will catch your attention. Right now that’s Telegraph Road from Dire Straits. The cut has a lot of electronically generated space and a fairly high dynamic range for a rock recording. But, the Pod pulls it off. Somehow, especially at rational volumes, the musical presentation holds together is the exact way you need to draw your attention into the music.

Wow.

$250?

I cannot think of a $500 pair of stereo speakers from any high end manufacturer of any era that can match the Apple HomePod’s essential musicality.

That fact, all by itself, is why I regard the HomePod and all of the amazing stuff that will surely come after it such a threat to what’s left of the high end.

In closing, I’m trying to imagine what would be involved in streaming to the HomePod from an analog turntable. Obviously, a really good phono preamp (got one) and a really good DAC (ditto). Then, all I have to do is trick AirPlay2 into streaming the resulting data at full resolution to the HomePod.

Hmmm…

Who knows? Maybe this will be possible by the time I’m working on the sequel to the sequel.

All you high end audio folks should have heard this kind of product coming and from this kind of company because it’s already too late for you to get out of the way.

The Apple HomePod is simply good.

 

Is the Apple HomePod a genuine threat to high end audio?