Which Arm Should Power the Golf Swing?

 

When I was a kid, my father (who was a really, really good player) told me I had too much right hand in my golf swing and that it resulted in my then-constant slice. This was sadly not one of my father’s better golf lessons and it took me years to learn that the opposite was true.

Now, the funny thing is that even though I know this, I sometimes find myself driving the downswing, and even initiating my takeaway, using the energy and force of my left arm.

Trying to avoid this tendency got me thinking (seldom a good thing when it comes to golf, but a really good thing in this case) about what some Youtube golf gurus had to say on the subject. The first video is from Steve Johnston and the fun starts at around the three minute mark. Johnston actually says that, “The left arm just hangs and is inert until the right arm stretches it and creates leverage.” The crucial part lasts about three minutes and is worth watching again and again to get the idea to fully penetrate thicker heads like mine.

Next, up is Martin Chuck in this video from way back in 2011. Roll forward to the forty second mark and you’ll hear him say that, “The left arm just hangs.”

Now I know both arms work together in every good golf swing. But, I also know that I tend to let my left arm take over both in effort and feel. I’m right handed and I know my right arm is stronger and more coordinated than my left. But still, I need to relearn this lesson far more often than you would think.

Hey, I’m trying…

When I allow the right arm to do its correct share of the work, the club’s path back and into the downswing is both easier and tidier, for lack of a better word. Also critical is what Johnston says about pulling, specifically when he says outright that there’s no pulling with the left arm.

Again, I know I’m guilty of that more than I care to admit. When it comes to golf, reminders from those who know better are great to have and frequently needed (by me, anyway).

 

 

 

Which Arm Should Power the Golf Swing?

The Rosemarks are installed, so let’s talk about the thrilling topic of Grip Solvent!

Yes, they’re perfectly aligned.

Yes, they’re fully seated.

Yes, I am a little too precise with this regripping thing and I’m not sure why.

I’m not even going to burden you with a blow-by-blow account of my grip replacement protocol.

Instead, let’s talk about grip solvent. I know, that’s some nasty, boring stuff.

IMG_1622

For years, I’ve used the Clubmaker brand, though I always disliked the smell and its tendency to cling to my hands even after repeated washings. So, I decided to try Wedge Guys grip solvent. It was reputed to smell better or at least less bad.

It’s true. It doesn’t smell bad at all and the order doesn’t seem to linger in the air as long as Clubmaker.

But…

There’s a problem. It also isn’t quite as uniformly slick when you’re installing the grip, no matter how much is used. It’s like there are slick spots and sticky spots and this is no good especially when you’re installing expensive grips.

Also…

The stuff dries very slowly and, this is a weird one, stays a little slimy even after it’s been on a grip for weeks.

How do I know this?

I know because I removed a few grips weeks after I installed them and the grip caps were still slimy and almost damp. Remember, this is SoCal so it’s both hot and dry.

So, my experiment is over…I’m sticking with Clubmakers.

Sorry, Wedge Guys!

The Rosemarks are installed, so let’s talk about the thrilling topic of Grip Solvent!

One is not enough & four is not too many: My SeeMore FGP collection

I bought my first SeeMore FGP on a whim. The aged FGP was sitting forlorn deep in the used putter orphanage at my local golf shop.

I believe I paid $35 for my belovedFGP.

That FGP marked a significant development for my putting. Before I owned that putter, I had played many different styles of putters, never staying with any one design for long and always being disappointed with my putting.

Then came the FGP. That original SeeMore FGP forever changed my outlook on putting. Putts started to look makable and on good days, easy.

Yup, as of today I own four SeeMore FGPs. The original, the one my golf buddy has named, Big Daddy, stays home during most rounds. It will always be my favorite but I usually find myself using my only new FGP, a limited edition putter (mine is number 45 of 100), when I play. I like the all-black shaft a little better than the two-tone shafts of the originals.

All of my FGPs use brass heads. I have used a stainless version of the FGP before but something about the sound is slightly less satisfying to me. It took me forever to find an all-brass model then one day a fine example popped up with its original cover and a somewhat smooth SeeMore grip.

The SeeMore grip is great for originality’s sake but I prefer the superb Rosemark grip. The IOmic grip in the photo is a temporary stand-in while I wait for another Rosemark.

Used SeeMore head covers are hard to come by in good shape. I wish SeeMore would make a move to covers from AM&E but that’s only because I’m a relentlessly picky SOB. In addition to the old and new original SeeMore covers there’s my new UCLA cover and a simple but high quality leather cover from Stitch Golf.

My latest FGP acquisition is another adopted orphan. Its finish was rough but the face and top line were clean so I snapped it up for $30. I am waffling between the idea of refinishing the crinkle-black finish or leaving it rat-rod style. I did take one liberty with the putter. It was originally built to 36″ so I carefully cut it down to 34″ to match its stablemates and installed the IOmic for now.

In my opinion, the design of the SeeMore FGP is as relevant to putting as the Ping Anser and, arguably, the FGP is the better design from the standpoints of ease of use and pure performance. For players who are wise enough to adopt the design and learn to use SeeMore’s simple, logical system better putting is all but assured. You won’t have to buy four SeeMore putters to learn the lesson. Buy one and you’ll be sold forever.

One is not enough & four is not too many: My SeeMore FGP collection

Kingdom of Dreams Part 3

This is Part 3 of Kingdom of Dreams, my 2014 golf short story.

Part 4 will be available soon so please check back.

I hope you enjoy it and thanks for having a listen.

By the way, you can buy the ebook here: Kingdom of Dreams ebook at Amazon.

Kingdom of Dreams Part 3

Kingdom of Dreams Part 2

This is Part 2 of Kingdom of Dreams, my 2014 golf short story.

Part 3 will be available soon so please check back.

I hope you enjoy it and thanks for stopping by and having a listen.

You can buy the ebook here: Kingdom of Dreams ebook at Amazon.

Kingdom of Dreams Part 2

Kingdom of Dreams Part 1

This is Part 1 of Kingdom of Dreams, my 2014 golf short story.

Part 2 will be available in a week or so.

I hope you enjoy it and thanks for stopping by.

You can buy the ebook here: Kingdom of Dreams ebook at Amazon.

KOD Cover for Blog Part 1

 

Kingdom of Dreams Part 1