A Conversation with Tom Slighter of Slighter Golf

I’ve followed Tom Slighter of Slighter Golf for a long time, all the way back to the days when I consulted to Jim Von Lossow of Von’s Golf. Back then, I was very impressed by the purposeful look of Slighter’s early putters.

A while back, while researching new putter companies, I happened across the Slighter Golf website again and realized that the guy who had been a relative newcomer way back when had become one of the stallworts of the independent putter craft.

And here I emphasize the word craft. CNC and 3D printing are amazing and I am glad I live in a world where they exist and help make our lives easier. But, craft is as important as programing. Tom Slighter is a man with the rare ability to take an idea and make it real and to give it a kind of soul.

The putters Slighter Golf makes are more than mere tools or products. Rather, they’re invested with something of the man himself and that’s what appeals to me about Slighter Golf. I want to thank Tom and his entire team for being so generous with their time.

Paul Cervantes Back when you started out there weren’t many small putter companies in the US or anywhere for that matter. What made you decide to make your own putters?

Tom Slighter I first began changing grips and shafts on my own clubs in 1990.  Later that year I began repairing golf clubs for local clubs in Salem, Oregon for several years.  I was able to repair golf clubs for pay and free golf.  I was working for State Farm insurance at the time and in 1998, I transferred to Seattle, WA.  The golf courses in that area already had golf club repair shops so I did not pursue club repair. I had about 30 putters of my own that I decided to sell and pay off some debt from the move.  I used eBay to sell my putters and after selling all of them I realized there might be a market to refinish putters and sell them on eBay.  

I began refinishing putters in 1999 and used eBay to sell the putters I had refinished. I didn’t notice any one else refinishing putters at that time so I received numerous requests for refinishing work. After working on hundreds of putters and slowly building up my shop with equipment I decided to design my own putter.  I looked all over the Seattle area for a machinist to help me make my putter.  After being turned down multiple times, I found a machinist who had a small machine shop in Arlington, Washington who was willing to assist me.  

I spent a year prototyping a design and after many attempts we made my first putter I named the Seattle.  I manufactured twenty-seven Seattle putters and listed one on eBay in September 2002.  I was very nervous that it would not sell and be embarrassed.  To my surprise it did sell and in fact I sold out of the rest of the Seattle putters shortly thereafter.  I then designed the Tacoma, Bellevue, etc.  I purchased my first knee mill and started to learn how to use it.  I watched my machinist and practiced frequently.  I continued to develop my skills on the milling machine and became fairly proficient.  I began building a good size shop with all the necessary equipment to specifically work on putters. I had become nearly a completely self-sufficient machine shop that strictly was for building putters.  I could see that building and refinishing putters was beginning to be fairly lucrative.  I applied for my business license under Slighter Golf, developed a website and was off and running.  

Paul Cervantes These days there are a whole slew of New Kids on the Block making putters, companies like Brandon Matthew, Logan Olson’s Olson Manufacturing & Tyson Lamb are a few that come to mind. In some ways, it seems like it must have gotten easier for a new company to get started (because of CNC, 3D printing and the like). Are you glad you got your start when you did or would you rather get a putter company off the ground today (assuming you were twenty years younger)?

Tom Slighter I have noticed over the last 10 years there have been quite a few new and very talented putter designers.  Some are very gifted and may very well be the leaders in the industry.  The CNC process is pretty much the same, but the machines have more memory, newer programs and capabilities.  I never did learn to program however I wish that I had.  I was too busy making putters to really dive into that aspect. There are many great programmers, but I believe they should learn how to build a putter from the bottom up by hand.  Very few of those individuals are still around. In my opinion, watching a craftsman build a putter from a solid block of steel using a knee mill is fun to see. I am very proud to have started when I did many years ago, when there were only a few of us putter makers. Even then, it was a very difficult market to break into with so many trusted putter makers already on the market. 

Paul Cervantes I mentioned earier that I consulted to Jim Von Lossow (founder of Von’s Golf) when he was still making putters back in the 90s. At the time keeping up with production was an ongoing challenge for his company. As back order and lead times got longer customers got impatient. What are lead times like for a new Slighter putter? Is it a challenge to keep up or do you and your team have it down?

Tom Slighter Jim Von Lossow is a pioneer in his own right.  I remember meeting him in the early 2000s. He was very well known in the Seattle area for club repair, fitting and putter design.  I, unfortunately, did not chat much with Jim about his line of putters but I am sure he struggled with keeping up with demand and dealing with the reliability of machinists.  My early years, I was always backed up with orders.  I remember being ninety putters behind and fulfilling orders as quickly and efficiently as I could.  I was always up front with my customers on lead-time and followed up with progress updates.  I would not sell a putter to anyone who paid more for a rush order. It was not fair to my other customers.  I have a wonderful team today that can typically produce a custom putter in two weeks or less. 

Paul Cervantes What’s your favorite material to work with? And, I mean both from an ease of production perspective and from the perspective of the quality of the resulting putter? 

Tom Slighter I enjoy milling carbon steel as it is very soft and cuts like butter; not a fan of welding on carbon because it is so dirty. I love to weld on stainless steel because it so clean to work with.  The harder stainless steel metals like 15-5, 17-4, nitronic are difficult to mill and hard on cutters.  Copper is like milling gum but easy to stamp.  Brass will throw some fine chips and is also easy to stamp but both are just too soft for hosels and do not really offer the best feel.  Aluminum is good for larger putters like mallets to keep the weight reasonable; good for inserts and easy to mill.  

Paul Cervantes Beyond appearance do you think there’s an actual difference in feel (or sound) between a one-piece head and a putter with a welded hosel? I have a hunch about your answer but I’m very interested to learn what you think.

Tom Slighter I have not noticed any difference in sound or feel between a putter with a welded neck to that of a one-piece putter.  If a weld is done correctly, it is very solid.

Paul Cervantes How has your machining equipment and technique evolved over the last couple decades? Do you have any old equipment that you remain dedicated to even though there are newer & better machines out there?

Tom Slighter That is a great question.  I have a Sharp TMV-50 Knee mill I purchased new in 2006. I have made countless putters with it and modified hundreds of other putters.  I know every inch of that machine and it is definitely my go-to mill.  I was lucky to purchase a 1970 Grazziano SAG 12 lathe from a shop that was closing down.  The owner had purchased his Grazziano brand new when he started his business in his garage. When I purchased it in 2011 I was the second owner.  I have completely enjoyed this lathe ever since.  It is an awesome piece of equipment and knowing it’s past makes it all that much more special.  We do have multiple CNC machines for production runs.  

Paul Cervantes Tom, this is just me being me and getting in the way of my own interview. I think every putter maker on the planet who makes a Ping Anser variant ought to get out of bed every morning and be thankful that Karsten Solheim was so damn smart. Isn’t it amazing that the essential head shape of the Anser is still as viable as it is? It’s so ubiquitous that putter makers really have to make one, even the young guns and so-called innovators pretty much bow to Redwood City and Phoenix. As an aside I’m always surprised that even though Ping invented the dang thing they’ve nearly forgotten how to make a good one. Sorry, I’m not sure there’s even a question in there but maybe you can help me and tell me your thoughts about Karsten and the Ping Anser and Slighter Golf’s unique spin on it.

Tom Slighter Paul, you have a great understanding of the putter market.  I could not agree with you more.  PING’s design of the Anser was iconic and in turn was developed into the Anser 2 and Anser 4. Cameron completely redesigned the Anserputters into works of art.  He redesigned most of the PING line into works of art. PING had a dynasty in the putter market and in my opinion missed the boat by resting on their laurels. I admire Cameron’s ability to re-invent the wheel so to speak.  Genius.  When I started out I was intrigued by the old school TaylorMade T.P.A. series.  I loved the TaylorMade T.P.A. 8 of the 1980s.  I was influenced by their design and incorporated my spin to develop my line.  

I did not want to steal an idea but rather take what was already known and make it better.  If I could dab into the market that way and gain the trust of my customers anything else I design would be hopefully be accepted.  I understood that I was not going to ‘storm’ into the market, but rather work my way in the back door.  With that said, it is clear to me that the PING style putters are here to stay in one way shape or form.  You can always design a crazy new putter that may flood the market for a while (Cameron Detour is a great example) and then slowly ride off into the sunset.  However, I have noticed over the years that customers will fall back on the old classic putters.  Re-making them will always be a solid market. PING just hasn’t been able to match anything Cameron has made with respect to the Anser.

Paul Cervantes What’s next for you and your company? Do you want Slighter Golf to evolve into something new over the next decade or are you just happy to keep on keeping on?

Tom Slighter We are steady as she goes at this time. We are looking to expand more in the next year or so.  This situation with the pandemic has been interesting to say the least and hopefully when it has settled down more we will begin to develop in areas we have planned. I would also like to say that I don’t do all of this alone and with that in mind I’d like to recognize the rest of my team, Jason Smith, Mike Place & Will Borg.

My name is Mike Place.  I have over 30 years of machining experience. Although I do not golf on a regular basis, I admire the same high standards golfers expect.  Whether it is a simple adjustment, small modification, or a complete refinishing, I get satisfaction out of applying my same high standards to working on putters; I come to appreciate them for what they are and how important they are to our customers.  
Working with Tom Slighter has been a great experience on all levels.  I have learned so many things about the sport.  I get excited every time I see a new putter come in.  It is an opportunity for me to  use my many years of machining in ways I never thought I would.  Thanks so much to our customers for trusting in Slighter Golf.  Thanks to customer feedback I have come to learn just how important a putter is.
My name is Will Borg.  I have been a machinist for over 15 years.  I have always liked working with metals, whether it is welding, milling, or fabricating.  “To make something that didn’t exist into something that someone can enjoy is very rewarding.”  I have been lucky enough to have worked with Tom and learn from one of the best, and learning all the fine details that go into building high end putters.
Mike Place & Will Borg of Slighter Golf
I’m Jason Smith. I’ve had the pleasure of Tom’s acquaintance for more than 12 years. Since our introduction, I have been extremely enthused to work with Tom designing, machining putters and the occasional day on the course. I have a real passion for golf, I grew up on a golf course and have been playing since I was a little boy. These days, I enjoy the game with my entire family, especially my son Preston. Preston played varsity golf on the local high school golf team. Anytime we want to test out a new prototype, Preston quickly volunteers to take on the task. 
Along with golf, I’m passionate about manufacturing, specifically designing and producing product. I’ve had the pleasure of designing product used all over the world and beyond, from the bottom of the ocean to outer space. It’s nice to see literally millions of components in use, designed with my team, but nothing is more satisfying than playing a game with something so innocent as a high-quality putter co-designed and CNC machined with Tom Slighter. Being 50 years old, I havemade an enormous circle of friends and resources throughout my life. That being said, I hold very few on a throne as high as I hold Tom Slighter, when it comes to excellence as a human being. I am truly grateful to be working along side of him, I look forward to many more years.
I thoroughly enjoy my family time especially now that I have more time with my wife, Bonnie.  I cannot thank my family enough for being there for me in so many meaningful ways.  I used to work 7 days a week for a combined 70 hours at my day job and the putter business for 18 years.  I embraced every minute developing my putter business through the ups and downs.  I met so many interesting people along the way that I would not exchange for the world.  
 Partnering up with my dear friend, Jason Smith has allowed me, for the most part to retire from the putter business. I am now able to golf twice a week, snorkel, fish, work out in the gym, hang out with Bonnie at the beach, basically
enjoy a whole different period of my life. 
 Jason is a very gifted and brilliant machinist, incredible business entrepreneur, and down right kind hearted individual. It is an honor to work with Jason and his team.  Working with Mike Place and Will Borg who are gifted machinists in their own right have honed 
their skills to that of the golf industry.  They have increased the skillset of Slighter Golf to an entirely different level.  
Amy Reems, our office manager, Sarah Clogston, our office assistant and Justin Crawford, our consultant have a passion for our business and provide incredible service to our customers. I am truly honored to have the opportunity of working with each 
one of them in our effort to meet the needs of our customers.  

Thank you so very much.
A Conversation with Tom Slighter of Slighter Golf

The new Rosemark Grips have arrived!

Grips

Regular readers know I am a huge fan of Rosemark grips.

I have been a believer in Rosemark since 2016 and I use their grips in all my putters.

I am very excited to learn if these new grips can meet or possibly exceed the standard set by the original Rosemark designs that I’ve used with great success.

Only time will tell.

They new ones look great and I’ll be installing them pursuant to my usual obsessive-compulsive grip installation standards later this afternoon.

 

The new Rosemark Grips have arrived!

Rosemark Putter Grip Review

I first heard about Rosemark grips from Jim Grundberg at SeeMore. I’ve learned to take Jim’s tips quite seriously when it comes to putting. Still, I have to say that my initial response was luke-warm at best. But, then I took a look at the Rosemark website and gradually my interested piqued. Good putting is art and science. Sometimes it can seem as if these qualities are in short supply when it comes to new products. But, when a product finally comes along that works in both realms, at the same time, the results are always exciting for me and for the rest of the market.

Jim was also kind enough to introduce me to Rosemark’s Mark Cokewell. I can’t help myself; I always wonder why someone would get into the golf business, especially these days. Mark Cokewell told me, “I am by profession a pilot. I started in the golf business by entering a contest on the Golf Channel called Fore Inventors Only. I had an idea for a long putter that was a face-on design and used a one arm pendulum stroke method. There were no grips available that worked for my putter so I designed one. The shape had to be stable for use one handed either right or left. It had to be 26 inches long so it would reach from the armpit to the palm of player’s hand with a straight arm. And, it had to be able to square the putter with one hand / arm. So I started by mapping the hand to see how it would naturally fold around a grip. My putter was called the Krutch because it anchored in your armpit. As it turned out I got quite a positive response to my grip and in 2012 had two players on the Champions Tour sign contracts with me to play my grip. J.L. Lewis and Keith Fergus. At the end of 2012, the USGA proposed ruling out anchoring and that put an end to my putter. In late 2013, I re-tooled to make my grip for standard putters.

In may of 2014 I brought the grip onto the Champions Tour and got good play by several guys including Kenny Perry and Colin Montgomerie. In 2015 I took my grip to the PGA and LPGA tour and did very well. In 2015, Colin Montgomerie won the Senior PGA at French Lick with my 1.25 grip. Lydia Ko started playing my 1.52 MFS grip at the US Women’s Open. She has won two majors with it, eight tournaments, and a Silver Medal in the Olympics. Russell Knox won the Travelers this year with our 1.25 MFS grip.”

I would describe that as one heck of a lot of success, especially when you consider the hit Cokewell took with the USGA’s anchor ban earlier this year.

The Rosemark grip was compelling to me for at least three reasons. First, is the use of the six-sided, patented shape. The second is the use of the silicone beads for good grip and the third is the wonderful smoothness of the microfiber. According to Cokewell, “We feel like the greatest benefits to our grips are the ability of the player to relax the tension and maintain full control of the putter throughout the stroke. And, be confident that the putter will remain square even with a light grip pressure.”

I consider myself a better than average putter. My results come from a good amount of hard work and devotion to the SeeMore approach to putter design and use. That said, when I’m under the gun and putting for par, my grip tension increases. If I’m on top of it, I can throttle it back. But, that is a kind of second-guessing when you think about it. I can find myself wondering what the proper level of grip pressure is, especially if the putt is meaningful.

The Rosemark grip minimizes my tendency to ramp up pressure. The putter always feels secure in my hands, especially over the ball. Again, it feels like the cross sectional shape and the two different textures work at once to encourage a constant and light grip. What a simple recipe to making more putts.

Just as important, but not often talked about, is a grip’s feel at impact. I’m a feel and sound junkie. That’s why I prefer my old brass SeeMore head to my new stainless steel SeeMore. It’s not better, but it is different. Some putter grips tend to deaden sound and feel. I hate this. It serves only to break down the putter’s connection to the guy doing the putting; me.

When it comes to the materials Rosemark uses Cokewell said, “The MFS microfiber silicone is the result of us wanting to offer a more durable and washable grip to our customers. We made our grips, originally, in the industry standard (think SuperStroke) PU material. This material has some excellent benefits and we do offer our 1.25 and 1.52 grip in this material, but it gets dirty quickly and tends to lose its tackiness. It’s also not very durable in hot humid weather areas. Our MFS material lasts twice as long and resists dirt better so it stays tackier longer. Plus it’s washable. It has excellent durability in all weather. We are working to improve its playability when cold and wet as the silicone stiffens a bit when cold.”

My older Rosemark has gotten some very heavy use over the last four months and it still looks and feels great.I requested the second grip to compare its feel to the older grip.You can see from this photo that the black has faded a touch, but the feel is identical to the new blue grip in the photo.  I would say that usual care is in order. Keep your putter out of the trunk of your car and the Rosemark should last a very long time.

rosemark

I asked Cokewell if Rosemark had plans to get into grips, beyond grips exclusively for putters. He said, “Rosemark is working on a material that would completely change the grip market. It’s in early development and of course it’s a secret at this point. If we’re able to make it work we will expand to all grips not just putter grips.

Soon, we will have samples of our new Elite grip which will be 13 inches and weigh approximately 60 grams. We’re very excited about this grip. Several pros have had input in this grip design.”

Again, I want to thank Jim Grundberg at SeeMore and Mark Cokewell at Rosemark for turning me on to a product that has already helped my game. Like Mark Cokewell says, “Putting is stressful enough without fighting your equipment!”

I couldn’t agree more. You owe it to yourself to try a Rosemark grip over the off season.

Your game will be better when the new season arrives.

Rosemark Putter Grip Review